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Clinical and Interventional Research

The department conducts a wide range of clinical and intervention research. Broadly, this work aims to develop and test the efficacy of biomedical and behavioral interventions and clinical assessment tools as well as to identify risk factors for a wide range of psychiatric conditions, including major depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder and psychotic disorders.

 
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Tina Boisseau, PhD

Tina Boisseau leads the SOAR Lab, which strives to examine the emotional and behavioral factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and anxiety disorders.

Tina Boisseau, PhD, focuses on designing interventions to improve the long-term treatment and outcome of patients with emotional disorders, with particular emphasis on OCD and anxiety disorders. Boisseau leads the SOAR Lab, which focuses primarily on two intersecting areas: 1) the hypothesis-driven development and adaptation of empirically-supported treatments and 2) the use of translational research methods to identify critical, transdiagnostic mechanisms of dysfunction and barriers to recovery. A secondary focus of the laboratory is on eating disorders, particularly as they relate to other OC spectrum conditions.

Currently, in collaboration with researchers at Brown Medical School, the lab is investigating harm avoidance and incompleteness as dimensional endophenotypes in anxiety and obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions (R01 NIMH R01 MH110449). They are also analyzing data from our naturalistic, prospective study of OCD.

Contact

676 North Saint Clair Street
Suite 1000
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact ocdanxietylab@northwestern.edu or visit the lab site.

 
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Allison J. Carroll, PhD

Allison Carroll is a clinical health psychologist and a core faculty member in the Building Relationships/Research for Implementation and Dissemination to Generate Equitable Systems (BRIDGES) Program. Her research focuses on implementing effective behavioral interventions to promote psychological, behavioral, and physical wellbeing.

Allison Carroll, PhD, is part of the BRIDGES team (https://bridges.northwestern.edu/) and is a collaborator on a number of research studies focused on implementation science, community-engagement, behavioral interventions, chronic disease prevention and management, and health equity. Some projects with which she is involved include:

 

Contact

750 North Lake Shore Drive
Suite 1000
Chicago, IL 60611

allison.carroll@northwestern.edu

For inquiries about this research, please contact bridges@northwestern.edu or visit the Bridges Program webpage.

 
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Diane Chen, PhD

Diane Chen’s programmatic research focuses on advancing evidence-based affirming care for transgender and nonbinary (TNB) youth and youth with differences of sex development/intersex variations (DSD/I). Her work examines outcomes of gender-affirming medical/surgical interventions for TNB youth, experiences of stress, stigma, and resilience in TNB youth and youth with DSD/I, reproductive health and fertility preservation in TNB and DSD/I youth populations, and medical decision-making. More recent efforts have also focused on intervention development and adaptation to address the unique medical and mental health needs of TNB youth.

 The Center for Gender, Sexuality, and HIV Prevention is the behavioral research arm of Lurie Children’s Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine (https://www.luriechildrens.org/en/specialties-conditions/adolescent-medicine/research/). Dr. Chen’s current/recently completed projects include:

  1. Trans Development Study (R01 MH123746; MPI). This study aims to define the impact of pubertal suppression treatment in transgender youth on mental health trajectories and underlying neural systems.

 

  1. Gender Journey Project (R01 HD097122; MPI). This study establishes a national cohort of prepubertal TNB youth and their parents to longitudinally assess gender development, mental health, and psychosocial functioning over time.

 

  1. Trans Youth Care Study (R01 HD082554; Co-Investigator). This is the first US-based cohort of transgender youth initiating pubertal suppression treatment and gender-affirming hormones. Currently in the second 5 years of funding, this study will elucidate physical and psychosocial outcomes 6 years after starting medical treatment.

 

  1. Project AFFRMED (R21 HD097459; PI). This study developed and tested the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a patient-centered Aid For Fertility-Related Medical Decisions (AFFRMED) targeted for transgender youth facing decisions about fertility preservation. 

 

Contact

1440 North Dayton Street
Suite 300
Chicago, IL 60642

For inquiries about this research, please contact DiChen@luriechildrens.org

 
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Mehmet Dokucu, MD, PhD

Mehmet Dokucu is involved in clinical and translational research involving brain stimulation therapies, TMS, ECT, neuromodulation and cancer psychiatry.

Contact

710 North Lake Shore Drive
Suite 1300
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact m-dokucu@northwestern.edu.

 
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Hongxin Dong, MD, PhD
Hongxin Dong's research focuses on the interaction of genetic and environmental influences on neurodevelopment and aging and their relevance to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).

Hongxin Dong, MD, PhD, has focused on a continuous and integrated program of investigating genetic alterations and environmental effects on neurodevelopment and aging, and their relevance to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly Alzheimer’s disease. Ongoing NIH funded projects to discover novel molecular genetics and epigenetic mechanisms underlying neuropsychological disorders, using human antemortem clinical assessments and postmortem tissues, as well as animal models. The findings from the translational work will help in the development of new therapeutic strategies to slow disease onset and prevent progression.

Contact

303 East Chicago Avenue
Suite 700, Room 103
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact h-dong@northwestern.edu

 
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Jacqueline Gollan, PhD
Jacqueline Gollan leads the Biobehavioral Experimental Therapeutics Research (BETR) Lab focuses on:
  1. Behavioral activation and cognitive behavioral psychotherapy, with particular focus on identifying mechanisms to improve patient outcomes in mood disorders.
  2. Strengthening patient learning and decision-making in treatment.
  3. Computational models of learning to predict course of treatment.

Jacqueline Gollan, PhD, seeks to discover therapeutic mechanisms that help people recover from depression. Using an experimental therapeutics approach in which the team identifies and interrupts processes associated with depression, they apply this knowledge to build new neuro-informed behavioral treatments for depression to serve the community here in Chicago and beyond. Other interests include (a) building the lab’s capabilities to leverage neuroscience discoveries, specifically that of reinforcement learning in decision-making to optimize women’s health and (b) collaborating with researchers to provide clinical training and consultation on behavioral interventions in collaborative care and community mental health programs.

The BETR Lab is part of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences located at the Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders. The lab has space for private clinical interviews, neurocognitive tests, implicit stimulus presentations and data analyses of neuroimaging (SPM) and psychophysiological protocols.

The lab is a training setting that actively supports the research careers of undergraduates, PhD and MD trainees, and postdoctoral fellows. For example, they mentor the Asher Center's Women’s Behavioral Health Psychiatry fellows, provide an annual course on cognitive behavioral therapy for Northwestern graduate trainees and mentor undergraduate students in Northwestern University Multicultural Affairs Summer Research Opportunity Program.

Contact

676 North Saint Clair Street
Suite 1000
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact j-gollan@northwestern.edu.

Visit the Biobehavioral Experimental Therapeutics Research Lab (BETR) site.

 
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Evan Goulding, MD, PhD

Evan Goulding leads the LiveWell research group focuses on developing and testing smartphone-based self-management interventions for bipolar disorder with the goal of improving access to evidence-based techniques derived from existing psychotherapies for bipolar disorder. In addition, using self-report, application utilization and behavioral data, the group seeks to elucidate endophenotypes and trajectories to facilitate timely delivery of personalized interventions as means to improve clinical and recovery outcomes for individuals living with bipolar disorder.

Evan Goulding, MD, PhD, and his group have been developing a smartphone-based self-management intervention for bipolar disorder called LiveWell, which consists of a smartphone application, coaching support, a secure server and website. The development of LiveWell utilized a person-centered, intervention mapping approach during which the group obtained feedback from individuals with bipolar disorder, their mental health providers and the group's coaching staff. Based on this development process, they have created a behavior change framework integrating user feedback with information from empirically supported psychotherapies for bipolar disorder, health psychology behavior change theories and chronic disease self-management models. This behavior change framework allows labeling of intervention content in terms of outcomes (e.g. time to relapse), targets (e.g. early warning sign management) and determinants (e.g. self-efficacy, intention, planning, monitoring) addressed by the behavior change techniques delivered during application use (tracked via the application) or coach calls (recorded and transcribed). This provides a means to examine relationships between changes in outcomes, targets and determinants, along with exposure to behavior change technique content and tool use delivered to impact determinants of specific behavioral targets (e.g. medication adherence).

In addition, collection of behavioral data such as activity levels and sleep duration (actimetry), location (GPS) and social interactions (texts and calls) provides an opportunity to identify features correlated with clinical status and may improve the ability to determine what content to deliver when to a specific individual to improve treatment. Overall, the goal of the LiveWell intervention is to assist individuals in staying well while also serving as a platform for data collection that provides insights into treatment mechanisms and trajectories to allow iterative development and improvement of the intervention.

Contact

680 North Lake Shore Drive
Suite 1500, Room 1520
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact livewellstudynu@gmail.com.

 
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Lisanne Jenkins, PhD

Lisanne Jenkins co-directs the Neuroimaging and Applied Computational Anatomy Laboratory (NIACAL), which uses a multimodal neuroimaging and interdisciplinary approach to affective neuroscience, including the study of neural networks involved in emotion and reward as well as their dysfunction in psychiatric disorders.

Lisanne Jenkins, PhD, co-directs the Neuroimaging and Applied Computational Anatomy Laboratory (NIACAL) with lab founder Lei Wang, PhD, now at The Ohio State University. Current lab members include PhD candidate Ashley Heywood, Research Assistant Sonya Gupta and psychiatry resident Samantha Patel. NIACAL seeks to develop multidimensional and multimodal neuroimaging biomarkers using tools of computational anatomy.

In 2020 Jenkins was awarded a KL2 from Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NUCATS) for the project "Structural brain network properties of neuropsychiatric symptoms across dementias." This project uses connectomics to analyse structural brain networks across behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Jenkins relates findings in brain networks important for emotional salience, reward processing and cognitive control to neuropsychiatric symptoms involving emotion dysregulation, including apathy and disinhibition.

Jenkins is also the Northwestern PI for a multisite neuroimaging study titled "Trajectories of Emotion Regulation and related Brain Regions And Intrinsic Networks" (TERBO BRAIN). This project is part of the Pediatric HIV/AIDS cohort study (PHACS). Youths who were perinatally exposed to HIV perform fMRI tasks which they relate to HIV-related variables. For comparison groups, they are leveraging data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) and Human Connectome Project (HCP) datasets.

Jenkins is also the Northwestern PI for a project titled "A harmonized medial temporal lobe subregion segmentation protocol: An essential element for dementia research."

In line with her KL2 project, she has recently published two literature reviews related to neuropsychiatric symptoms in neurological disorders:

  1. Jenkins, L.M., Wang, L., Rosen, H. & Weintraub, S. (2022) A transdiagnostic review of neuroimaging studies of apathy and disinhibition in dementia. Brain, 145: 1886-1905.
  2. Patron, V.G., Rustomji, Y., Yip, C., & Jenkins, L.M. (2022). Psychiatric comorbidities in functional neurological disorders. Practical Neurology, March/April: 71-75.

Jenkins' full list of publications can be found here on the NIH website

Contact

710 North Lake Shore Drive
Suite 1300, Room 1350
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact lisanne.jenkins@northwestern.edu.

 
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Tali Raviv, PhD
Tali Raviv's research program focuses on promoting mental health and resilience for children and communities impacted by poverty, toxic stress and trauma, and racism. We conduct school- and community-based intervention research in partnership with school and community leaders. Our work examines the effectiveness, implementation, dissemination and sustainability of school- and community-based interventions, with the goal of improving access to culturally relevant and evidence-informed prevention, early intervention, and mental health treatment programs and reducing health disparities. I also have a specific interest in school-based program development and evaluation.

Lurie Children’s Center for Childhood Resilience (CCR) is dedicated to promoting access to mental health services for youth. CCR develops, evaluates, and disseminates programs to promote systems change, increase access and reduce mental health disparities.Current Projects:The Resilience Education to Advance Community Healing (REACH) Statewide Initiative is supported by Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Funds (ESSER II) from the U.S Department of Education. REACH goals are: 1) To prepare educators and schools to support student mental health and resilience via trauma-informed policies and practices; 2) to foster educators’ personal and professional resilience and self-care; and 3) to assist districts in creating school mental health structures and data-riven approaches to addressing trauma and building resilience. CCR is partnering with the American Institutes of Research and Loyola University Chicago to conduct a mixed-methods analysis of the REACH implementation and outcomes.National Center for Safe Supportive Schools (NCS3; https://ncs3.org) is a SAMHSA-funded center within the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN). The mission is to provide states, districts, and schools with the knowledge and tools to implement culturally responsive, trauma-informed policies and practices that promote equity and well-being.The Stress and Coping Toolkit is a series of brief lessons and activities implemented by 6th, 7th, and 8th grade teachers to build student coping skills and mental health awareness, promote positive social connections, and enhance resilience in the face of ongoing stress. The toolkit was developed in partnership with Chicago Public Schools, and we are examining feasibility, acceptability, and initial utility.Strengthening Transition Resilience of Newcomer Groups (STRONG). In partnership with Loyola University Chicago and Chicago Public Schools, we are using a group randomized mixed-methods design to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of the STRONG school-based intervention (Hoover, 2018) in promoting mental health and resilience among newcomer students.

 

Contact

680 North Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact traviv@lurieschildren.org

 

 
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Herbert Meltzer, MD

Herbert Meltzer's research focuses on cognitive and movement disorders in psychiatric patients (clinical and preclinical). He leads the Translational Neuropsychopharmacology Laboratory.

Contact

303 East Chicago Avenue
Suite 700, Room 101
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact mahdi.arshadi@northwestern.edu.

Visit the Translational Neuropsychopharmacology Laboratory webpage.

 
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Jeffrey Rado, MD, MPH

Jeffrey Rado, a primary clinical researcher in the Clinical Trials Unit, focuses on the study of new medication treatments for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. The program aims to use research to advance new evidence-based treatments in areas of high unmet need, including cognitive impairment and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. He has a particular interest in the study of novel approaches to prevent weight gain and metabolic derangements associated with antipsychotic medications.

Jeffrey Rado, MD, MPH, has nearly 20 years of experience conducting clinical trials. His work focuses on improving the lives of individuals with serious mental illness. His research interests include prevention and management of weight gain and metabolic derangements associated with antipsychotic medications.

The Clinical Trials Unit has a long history of conducting clinical research studying innovative treatments for a variety of psychiatric disorders, particularly syndromes where currently available treatments are inadequate. We have conducted industry-sponsored trials in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, treatment-resistant major depression, negative symptoms in schizophrenia, cognitive impairment in schizophrenia and in bipolar disorder and the use of long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication for early phase treatment of schizophrenia in young adults.

Current Projects

  • Assessment of ERG components to discriminate between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder type I: study of electroretinography as a means to diagnostically differentiate between schizophrenia and bipolar I
  • TWAIN 1: TAAR-1 partial agonist in patients with negative symptoms of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder: clinical trial of ralmitaront to address apathy, asociality and affective flattening in schizophrenia
  • A Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Comparison of NRX-101 to Standard of Care for Patients with Moderate Bipolar Depression with Subacute Suicidal Ideation and Behavior: clinical trial of lurasidone plus D-cycloserine to treat depressive symptoms in bipolar disorder.

Recent work:
A recently completed trial focused on testing a new medication to reduce the cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. We also completed a study of the antidepressant fluvoxamine to prevent clinical worsening of COVID-19. Their team participated in a multi-center trial of olanzapine-samidorphan for the prevention of weight gain in young adults with newly diagnosed schizophrenia.

Their senior research coordinator is Ankit Jain, MS.

The team has collaborated with other Northwestern basic science and clinical investigators including Herbert Meltzer, MD; Mehmet Dokucu, MD, PhD, and James Reilly, PhD, as well as others across the country.

Contact

680 North Lake Shore Drive
Suite 1500
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact jeffrey.rado@nm.org

 
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James Reilly, PhD

James Reilly's research in the Reilly Lab focuses on the evaluation of neurocognition in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders (psychosis, affective disorders) and acquired conditions, such as mild traumatic brain injury, with an aim to bridge the basic cognitive and clinical neurosciences in this research.

Work in the lab of James Reilly, PhD, focuses on understanding how cognitive control processes — those processes that help guide thought and behavior based on internally generated goals — are altered in individuals with or at risk for various forms of psychopathology and those with acquired conditions, and how these processes are altered by various treatments. They use neuropsychological and translational laboratory and fMRI approaches adopted from the cognitive neurosciences to study the functional neural networks involved in the control of attention, working memory and behavioral responding and how these are altered in a range of clinical populations. They use these same approaches to evaluate impact of novel interventions (pharmacological or behavioral) targeting cognition and functional neural systems among healthy and clinically affected individuals, with the aim towards identifying promising treatments for cognitive impairment to bring to clinical populations. Students in their lab have the opportunity to learn diagnostic and clinical assessment procedures, standard neuropsychological methods for evaluating cognitive functioning and laboratory and fMRI based acquisition and analysis of neurophysiologic data.

 

Contact

710 North Lake Shore Drive
Suite 1300, Room 1315
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact james.reilly@northwestern.edu.

 
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Emily Rogalski, PhD

Emily Rogalski is a clinical and cognitive neuroscientist and the associate director of the Mesulam Center for Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease at Feinberg. She directs three research programs:

  1. Neuroimaging of Aging, Alzheimer’s and Related Dementias
  2. Primary Progressive Aphasia Research Program (which includes the Communication Bridge non-pharmacological intervention program)
  3. The multisite SuperAging Research Initiative

Emily Rogalski, PhD, the Ann Adelmann Perkins and John S. Perkins Professor of Alzheimer's Disease Prevention, has a successful history of consistent foundation and NIH funding spanning more than 15 years. Her research uses a multimodal and interdisciplinary approach and primarily focuses on two aging perspectives: primary progressive aphasia (PPA), in which neurodegenerative disease invades the language network, and SuperAging, in which individuals are seemingly resistant to the deleterious changes in memory associated with “normal” cognitive aging.

SuperAging Research Initiative: SuperAgers are 80+ year-olds with episodic memory function that is at least as good as cognitively average individuals in their 50s and 60s. Rogalski operationalized and established the SuperAging phenotype and leads the NIA-funded multisite SuperAging Research Initiative.

PPA Research Program: Rogalski's PPA research spans more than 15 years and has focused on characterizing the clinical and anatomical features of PPA, ascertaining the drivers of disease progression and identifying potential genetic and developmental risk factors. This work has also led to fundamental changes in the understanding of language network organization.

Care, support and non-pharmacologic intervention: Another important goal of Rogalski's research is to optimize access to high-quality non-pharmacological care for individuals with Alzheimer’s and related dementias (ADRD). She has developed educational programs, one of the first support groups for individuals living with PPA and, more recently, the Communication Bridge Intervention, which is designed to maximize communication and quality of life for individuals living with PPA and their carepartners. She currently leads an NIH Phase 2 randomized, clinical trial testing the efficacy of the Communication Bridge Intervention.

Multisite study leadership: Rogalski serves in leadership roles for two NIA-funded P30 awards and is the Neuroimaging Biomarker Core Leader for Northwestern’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) and the Pilot/Exploratory Studies Co-Core Leader for Northwestern’s Pepper Center. She is also a site PI for multi-center NIH initiatives, including the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and Longitudinal Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study (LEADS).

Contact

300 East Superior Street
Tarry Building
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact e-rogalski@northwestern.edu.

Visit the Mesulam Center for Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease website.

 
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Stewart Shankman, PhD

The Northwestern Emotion and Risk (NEAR) Lab, led by Stewart Shankman, conducts multi-method research to examine (a) the relation between mood and anxiety disorders, (b) risk factors and familial transmission of emotional disorders and (c) novel treatments for individuals suffering from emotional disorders. The research program integrates clinical and epidemiological approaches with methods from neuroscience and mobile technologies.

Led by Stewart Shankman, PhD, the NEAR Lab's research focuses on the relation between depression and anxiety disorders and on novel treatments and risk factors for these difficult-to-treat emotional disorders. Depression and anxiety (aka "internalizing psychopathologies") are serious and prevalent public health problems with an economic burden of hundreds of billions of dollars that has been increasing in recent years. While moderately efficacious treatments have been developed for these conditions (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapies, SSRIs), treatment response is very heterogeneous. The group’s research attempts to (a) improve the understanding of internalizing psychopathologies and their risk factors, (b) identify specific targets for intervention and prevention efforts for specific individuals and (c) develop more effective interventions and preventative strategies to help people suffering from these conditions. The lab came to Northwestern in 2019 and is currently conducting multiple NIH-funded projects utilizing a variety of methods (e.g., fMRI, electrophysiology, laboratory behavioral paradigms, treatment development). Recently, their two largest R01s have focused on psychomotor disturbance in adults with depression, as well as social processes and smartphone use in adolescence with depression.

Contact

680 North Lake Shore Drive
Suite 1500, Room 1532
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact stew.shankman@northwestern.edu.

For more information on what the NEAR Lab is currently working on and their list of staff, visit their website.

 
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Sandra Weintraub, PhD, ABPP
Sandra Weintraub's research focuses on different cognitive aging trajectories and how they relate to age-related changes in the brain. She has developed cognitive testing instruments that are used throughout the NIH Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers Program and also led the Cognition domain team for the NIH Toolbox for Neurological and Behavioral Assessment, an NIH Blueprint project that provides common instruments for researchers to use across disparate studies.

Sandra Weintraub studies the determinants of “outlier conditions”, namely, unusually successful memory aging (Northwestern SuperAging Program) and of unusual forms of dementia (Primary Progressive Aphasia, behavioral variant Frontotemporal Dementia) that help elucidate resistance or regional brain vulnerability, respectively, to age-related neurodegenerative diseases. She collaborates with multidisciplinary researchers at Northwestern, nationally, and internationally on topics related to diagnosis of age-related cognitive decline.

 

Contact

676 North Saint Clair Street
Suite 1000
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact sandra.weintraub@northwestern.edu

 
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Katherine Wisner, MD, MS

Katherine Wisner is the director of the Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders, which fosters an intellectual environment that stimulates innovation and creativity, improves diagnostic services and develops novel treatment and prevention strategies for mood disorders. The center's multidisciplinary team conducts clinical translational research from early phase 1 and 2 drug studies to community-based programs and is internationally recognized for research and clinical expertise in perinatal mental health.

The Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders dates back more than 30 years to the commitment and dedication of Helen and Norman Asher, and the current commitment of Carol and Don Asher. Understanding that depressive disorders and related diseases have a devastating consequence on our society, and believing that the most effective future treatment of these disorders would be found by searching for the origins and processes of these diseases, the Ashers endowed a center and established the Norman and Helen Asher Professorship in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Katherine Wisner, MD, MS, is the current director of the Asher Center.

The Asher Center’s important work today is a testament to the Asher’s vision for Feinberg’s goals to continue to perform research to better understand the treatments of depression and to be an important resource to the community.

In 1995, the Asher Clinical Program, the center’s clinical treatment and research arm, was established as a collective operation that benefits from contributions of the Asher Center and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. The result is a high-quality, contemporary psychiatric care f acility for the diagnosis, treatment and study of depressive disorders, with a specific expertise in women's mental health and perinatal psychiatry.

Today, the Asher Center operates as a multidisciplinary facility combining clinical psychiatry and basic science research efforts to better understand and treat depressive disorders. The center has treated more than 3,000 individual patients who suffer from depressive disorders. Numerous graduate students and postdoctoral fellows have been trained in the assessment and treatment of mood disorders through the center, along with numerous psychiatry residents. The center hosts an innovative perinatal mental health fellowship in collaboration with the COMPASS program in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Contact

676 North Saint Clair Street
Suite 1000
Chicago, IL 60611

For inquiries about this research, please contact b-sutcliffe@northwestern.edu

Please visit the Asher Center's website to learn more about faculty members' labs and research programs.

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